Immigration

  • April 02, 2024

    Security Guard Co. Settles DOJ's Immigration Bias Probe

    Nationwide security guard company Securitas Security Services USA Inc. has agreed to pay $175,000 to resolve investigations into its hiring practices that the U.S. Department of Justice was conducting after it received a complaint that the firm was discriminating against non-U.S. citizens, the government announced Tuesday.

  • April 02, 2024

    DOJ Adds 5 Members To Immigration Appeals Board

    The U.S. Department of Justice expanded its Board of Immigration Appeals, adding five jurists to its existing 23-member body to reduce the immigration courts' historic caseload.

  • April 01, 2024

    Fla. Judge Refuses To Pause Wage Rule For H-2A Workers

    A Florida federal judge on Friday adopted a magistrate judge's recommendation to uphold a U.S. Department of Labor rule raising the wages of H-2A agricultural workers, rejecting objections from farm groups that the report was overly deferential to the government's arguments.

  • April 01, 2024

    Investors Group Says New EB-5 Guidance Violates APA

    A trade association of EB-5 visa regional centers brought U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services into D.C. federal court, accusing the agency of abruptly changing the minimum investment period for foreigner investors seeking green cards without soliciting public comments.

  • April 01, 2024

    Farmworker Org. Seeks Ruling On Fla. Immigrant Transport Law

    Attorneys for the Farmworker Association of Florida Inc. have urged a federal judge to get a move on in deciding whether to block a Florida law that makes transporting unauthorized immigrants a crime, saying a recent Fifth Circuit decision provides the impetus.

  • April 03, 2024

    CORRECTED: Immigration Bond Cos. Owe $811M For Deceptive Practices

    A Virginia federal judge ordered Libre by Nexus Inc., a bonding company, to fork over more than $811 million in the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's suit alleging the company engages in predatory bonding practices targeting cash-strapped immigration detainees.

  • April 01, 2024

    DeSantis Ducks Mass. Suit Over Migrant Flights

    A Massachusetts federal judge has released Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis and most other defendants from a proposed class suit by a group of migrants who claim they were duped into boarding flights to Martha's Vineyard, ruling that the court lacked jurisdiction.

  • April 01, 2024

    Immigration Atty Can't Challenge Suspension For Phone Use

    An immigration attorney can't challenge her suspension before the Board of Immigration Appeals for refusing to stop using her phone in court, as a North Carolina federal judge has found the case moot because she failed to show how her reputation has continued to be harmed.

  • April 01, 2024

    Dems Urge Biden To Extend Immigrants' Expiring Work Docs

    Seventy congressional Democrats signed off on a letter released Monday urging the Biden administration to immediately extend employment authorization for tens of thousands of immigrants who will soon lose their ability to legally work due to processing delays.

  • March 29, 2024

    Northern Texas Judges Won't Adopt Judge-Shopping Rule

    Judges with the Northern District of Texas have opted not to make any changes to how cases are assigned, despite a recent letter from Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer urging the district to implement an updated policy aiming to prevent litigants from judge shopping, the district's chief judge said Friday.

  • March 29, 2024

    High Court SEC Case May Bear On DOJ's Immigration Probes

    A highly anticipated Supreme Court decision on the constitutionality of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's tribunal body could lend support to Walmart and SpaceX in immigration enforcement proceedings, and it may even have the potential to strike the foundation of immigration courts.

  • March 29, 2024

    Migrant's Death Had To Be Direct Shot, Ariz. Jury Hears

    Jurors weighing charges that an Arizona rancher murdered a migrant who was allegedly trespassing on his property heard testimony Friday from a weapons expert who said the fatal wound had to be from a direct shot as opposed to a stray falling bullet.

  • March 29, 2024

    GEO Group Brass Agree To Reforms To End Derivative Suit

    Shareholders who claimed executives of private prison contractor GEO Group Inc. lied about financing deals with major banks told a Florida federal judge that the company has agreed to a host of corporate reforms to end the derivative suit, which will include the appointment of a chief compliance officer.

  • March 29, 2024

    Bill Would Ease Native American Travel Across Canadian Border

    A bipartisan bill recently introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives would simplify the process for indigenous community members to cross the U.S.-Canadian border by eliminating a blood quantum requirement and allowing them to use tribal-issued identification as proof of membership in a federally recognized tribe.

  • March 29, 2024

    Judge Won't Stop Immigration Fee Hikes From Taking Effect

    A Colorado federal judge refused Friday to temporarily halt upcoming immigration fee hikes, saying the $5,775 increase the EB-5 investor will pay is a drop in the bucket compared to the plaintiff's $500,000 capital investment.

  • March 29, 2024

    Ohio School Beats Race Bias Suit Over Pandemic Layoffs

    The University of Akron defeated a lawsuit alleging it targeted two finance professors for layoffs during the pandemic because one is Black and one is Asian, with an Ohio federal judge ruling Friday that the academics relied on faulty statistical analysis to back up their claims.

  • March 29, 2024

    Varnum Grows Practice With Corporate Immigration Pro

    A Michigan law firm has picked up an immigration attorney with more than 25 years of experience helping businesses meet their immediate and long-term immigration needs.

  • March 29, 2024

    Slew Of Briefs To Justices Chide Feds' Spousal Visa Denial

    The U.S. Supreme Court has received a flood of amicus briefs, including from federal lawmakers, former U.S. Department of Homeland Security officials and the American Bar Association, asserting that the government unconstitutionally denied a man's spousal visa application by withholding a detailed explanation.

  • March 28, 2024

    Ariz. Rancher Appeared 'Calm' Before Body Found, Jury Hears

    A Border Patrol agent who responded to an Arizona rancher's call for help before a migrant was found dead admitted Thursday that he would expect a person who had just shot someone to be "nervous, shaken up," and the rancher was the opposite of that.

  • March 28, 2024

    Staffing Co. Takes $100K DOJ Deal To End Hiring Bias Claims

    An information technology staffing group agreed to pay $100,000 to resolve claims that its online job advertisements discouraged and excluded asylum-seekers and refugees from applying, the U.S. Department of Justice announced.

  • March 28, 2024

    Feds Lean On 5th Circ. SB 4 Order To Argue For Buoy Removal

    The Biden administration has told a Texas federal court that a Fifth Circuit ruling blocking a controversial Texas migrant arrest law confirms that the administration has a valid cause of action in seeking to remove the state's floating anti-migrant barriers.

  • March 28, 2024

    DOL Judge Rejects Hawaiian Hotel's H-2B Bid Over Lack Of Info

    A U.S. Department of Labor judge wouldn't let Grand Hyatt Kauai boost its staff with noncitizens during tourism season, faulting the Hawaiian resort for resubmitting the same information on its application in response to a request for more information.

  • March 28, 2024

    House To Push Impeachment Of DHS Head To Senate In April

    House Speaker Mike Johnson, R-La., and 11 other House Republicans urged Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., to quickly schedule the impeachment trial for U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas because the House will be sending over the articles of impeachment on April 10.

  • March 28, 2024

    Grading Garland: Attys Give AG Mixed Reviews 3 Years In

    U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland's name won't be on the ticket in November, but his performance three years into his tenure is a subplot in the 2024 presidential election.

  • March 27, 2024

    CFPB Flags False Advertising Risk For Money Transfer Firms

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau on Wednesday cautioned international money transfer providers about how they market themselves, saying advertising services as "free" when customers are still required to pay additional fees for converting or delivering funds may violate federal law.

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Expert Analysis

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

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    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

  • Federal Courts And AI Standing Orders: Safety Or Overkill?

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    Several district court judges have issued standing orders regulating the use of artificial intelligence in their courts, but courts should consider following ordinary notice and comment procedures before implementing sweeping mandates that could be unnecessarily burdensome and counterproductive, say attorneys at Curtis.

  • 7 E-Discovery Predictions For 2024 And Beyond

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    The legal and technical issues of e-discovery now affect virtually every lawsuit, and in the year to come, practitioners can expect practices and policies to evolve in a number of ways, from the expanded use of relevancy redactions to mandated information security provisions in protective orders, say attorneys at Littler.

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